The benefits of Arada

Its name Arada comes from a vernacular language practiced by a West African ethnic group that has provided many slaves to the West Indies. But it is also known as anamu, chicken grass, mucura, stinky verbena, fake garlic or even pee root!

It is an indigenous plant that grows in the forest and more specifically in shady wetlands. Its flowering takes place from November to February. It grows mainly on the Amerindian continent and in Martinique, this species grows spontaneously near houses, on wasteland, meadows, and undergrowth.

If it is sometimes called false garlic, it is especially because all the parts of the plant, and more particularly the root, exhale a strong, penetrating odor which remembers that of garlic. Some use it elsewhere to ward off insects that attack clothing and woolen fabrics or for bats.

History and traditional uses

Brazil

This plant is used as an analgesic (pain reliever) and anti-inflammatory drug especially for arthritis and gastric disorders. The Indians still use it for blood and vascular problems. It is one of seven plants used by the Cabloco community of Amazonia for the relief of pain. In Brazilian plant medicine, it is called Tipi and is considered an antispasmodic, diuretic, emmenagogue (which stimulates blood flow) and a sudorific (which causes sweating).

The root is more effective than the leaves. The root is considered anesthetic and analgesic. The leaves are used as a poultice for external use for headaches, rheumatic pains and other types of pain. It is also like a powerful insecticide.

Guatemala

In plant medicine in Guatemala, it is called Apacin and is used as a traditional remedy against sinusitis (by inhalation of the powder made from the root of the plant). The leaf-based decoction is for internal use to treat digestive problems, slow digestion and having gas and fever.

Its name Arada comes from a vernacular language practiced by a West African ethnic group that has provided many slaves to the West Indies. But it is also known as anamu, chicken grass, mucura, stinky verbena, fake garlic or even pee root!

It is an indigenous plant that grows in the forest and more specifically in shady wetlands. Its flowering takes place from November to February. It grows mainly on the Amerindian continent and in Martinique, this species grows spontaneously near houses, on wasteland, meadows, and undergrowth.

If it is sometimes called false garlic, it is especially because all the parts of the plant, and more particularly the root, exhale a strong, penetrating odor which remembers that of garlic. Some use it elsewhere to ward off insects that attack clothing and woolen fabrics or for bats.

Haiti

The leaf-based decoction is used externally as an analgesic for muscle pain and skin diseases. In Haiti, the extract made from crushed leaves or roots of arada is inhaled to treat migraines and a maceration of these leaves is used as an analgesic by mouthwashes for dental pain. It would also be used against water retention and for its action on emunctories.

It is, moreover, vesicant, antispasmodic and vermifuge. Descourtilz ranks it in the category of foul antispasmodics.

Puerto Rico

Roots have been reported as odontalgic (which heals dental pain). In Puerto Rico, a decoction of the plant is given to new mothers, to prevent accidents from diapers. Infusion of leaves is recommended to speed up and facilitate delivery and asthenia. The leaves are used for the preparation of aromatic baths causing general sweating which results in a decrease in temperature in the infectious febrile fevers. this preparation is also used in enema against intestinal fermentation.

Applied in a wet compress on the forehead, it relieves headaches

The juice of the fresh and crushed leaves is used for the disinfection of wounds. The dose used is 30 gr. per liter of water in decoction, to be taken by glass every hour.

In homeopathy, Petiveria’s indications are paralysis, paraplegia with numbness, feeling cold inside, cold in the bones. (Cabre)

The arada heals innumerable ailments such as digestive disorders, sinusitis, colds, and flu. The effectiveness of the anamu as anesthetic makes it effective against all kinds of pain, arthritis and muscle pain, migraines and toothache. This plant prevents many infections and regulates the nervous system by reducing anxiety.

The benefits of apricot country

You guessed it, it’s not the small orange apricot soft skin that we will talk to you. The apricot country or Zabricot peyi, mamey, Mammea americana has rough skin, can be as big as a melon and weigh up to 2 kg. It has firm flesh, and its taste is between mango and melon. It has several medicinal uses and in the garden, it is an excellent natural insecticide, safe for humans.

Native to the Caribbean and Central America, an apricot country is a fruit found throughout tropical America.

The Caribbean was fond of these fruits they called manchibouï. Father Labat, who discovered in the eighteenth century during his stay in the Caribbean, notes that “the French gave the name of apricot to a fruit that the Spanish call Mamet. This French name suits him only for the color of the flesh because for all the rest he does not look like him at all “. We have been deceived since all this time, realize!

Cultivated as a fruit tree for making jams and juices, it grows in the lower humid areas of the forest. Its tree can reach a height of 25 meters high and It blooms from May to June and from November to December. The fruit is harvested once it has fallen to the ground.

To consume it It is necessary to remove the thick skin by notching it in a cross, like an orange. Then, we eliminate the small white film (be careful it can cause digestive problems and it is bitter). It is then eaten by cutting small pieces until it reaches the core.

In terms of diet, the apricot country contains many vitamins and minerals. It has an interesting content of magnesium and vitamin B6, potassium, and folate (vitamin B9).

The bark gives a resin, (the Mami resin), formerly used to extract the plantar spines. The insecticidal properties of the tree are well known in the West Indies. It is especially the seeds that are used in capillary frictions to destroy lice, ticks, quids, and other animal parasites; but fruits, bark, leaves and resin that exude immature fruits are also used for this purpose. A decoction of the dry peel of the fruit combats indigestion. The decoction of the leaves would possess properties against hypertension. The apricot-country is considered as vermifuge throughout the Caribbean. To this end, children take a bath containing leaves associated with other plant species while adults drink an infusion of seeds. The fruit pulp applied to the wounds accelerates their healing. The distilled flowers produce an aromatic liquor, (creole water), formerly known for its digestive virtues, as well as an essential oil used in perfumery. In the Dominican Republic, the fresh leaf is applied locally against rheumatism. In Puerto Rico, leaf infusion is described as a febrifuge, while in Trinidad, bark decoction is a popular cough remedy (Longfosse).

Apricot country in fruit juice

In addition, there is even the Royal brand that has released a fruit juice this year, marketed under the name of Mammey juice. They first worked with their own orchard, then selected an ideal variety for the taste and the process of transformation including the criterion of adhesion of the core. In any case, thanks to this initiative, farmers will (perhaps) relaunch this culture which is tending to disappear. And it would be a shame because this fruit has many qualities. It is rich in carotenes even if it does not reach the contents of the carrot or the giraumon: 3.2 mg per 100g. In addition to that, it is low in calories and high in fiber.

Medicinal properties of the apricot country

Creole water, tonic, and digestive (flowers)

According to Geral Veyssière in The Big Book of Fruits and Vegetables of Martinique. The flowers were once used to prepare a liquor, known for its tonic and digestive virtues. The essential oil from distilled flowers is used in perfumery.

A natural insecticide (seeds)

The plant contains in all its parts the mammine, which is an insecticidal coumarin. Seeds are mainly used to make an insecticide that is non-toxic to humans and that is used both in the garden (for spraying plants) and on children’s lice and dog ticks. Multitasking, apricot.

Jean-Louis Longuefosse in Medicinal Plants Creoles gives us in the recipe to make an insecticide:

The skin of the apricot fruit country: attention, digestion

The decoction of the peel of the fruit combats indigestion. Drink a cup before meals in case of difficult digestion.

Leaves

In Puerto Rico, the infusion of leaves would be febrifuge and in the Dominican Republic, the leaves are applied to rheumatism. In the Caribbean, a bath containing leaves (in addition to other species) was used for deworming purposes.